DR Digital Collaboration – Don’t Reinvent!

This workshop will focus on incorporating Massachusetts Digital Literacy and Computer Science (DLCS) Digital Tools and Collaboration standards into the K12 curriculum. DR stands for “Don’t Reinvent”. While you won’t walk away from this workshop with a doctorate in digital literacy and collaboration, you WILL walk away with practical strategies for infusing DLCS standards into your existing lessons and curriculum! Learn how to create digital resources for your students such as escape rooms and choice boards. Engage students in creating their own digital artifacts including videos and games to demonstrate their learning. Give students the strategies they need to select reliable, current, and relevant digital sources to foster lifelong learning beyond the walls of your classroom and curriculum. Each module will include resources for elementary, middle, and high school educators.

Join us and take advantage of our $25 summer discount!

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: July 6, 2021

Course Details

Audience K-12 Classroom Teachers and Specialists
Level Beginner & Intermediate
Instructor Erin Foley
Dates

July 13, 2021 – August 10, 2021 

Time

Required live meetings:

7/13/21 from 4:00-5:30 pm &

8/10/21 from 4:00-5:30 pm

Earn 15 PDPs  
Location Online
MassCUE Member Cost $125
Non-Member Cost $165
Limit 20 Participants
Prerequisites Basic computer and Google Workspace for Education skills
Optional WSU Graduate credit 1 credit for $125 from WSU

Erin Foley

Erin Foley is the Digital Literacy Specialist at Hanover Middle School in Hanover, MA, and is a professional development course instructor for MassCUE. Erin is also a Google Certified Educator and a Google for Education Certified Trainer. She has 14 years of experience as a classroom teacher with 11 of those years specifically in the field of instructional technology. Erin is a member of the Hanover Public Schools Technology Committee and has led multiple trainings to assist teachers in transitioning to a hybrid learning environment. Erin has a M.A.T. degree from Quinnipiac University and holds 4 Massachusetts teaching licenses: Digital Literacy/Computer Science (5-12), Instructional Technology (K-12), Elementary (1-6), and Mathematics (5-8).

 

(1.5hr) Live Meeting:  7/13/21 from 4:00-5:30 

(3hrs) Module 1: Participants will view various resources to engage students in learning new content, such as escape rooms, choice boards, Pear Deck presentations, and EdPuzzle interactive videos. Participants will also view videos and presentations that demonstrate how to create each of the abovementioned resources. An asynchronous discussion of the learning tools of this module will be required. Participants will respond to guiding questions and provide feedback to other participants.

(3hrs) Module 2: Participants will learn about various tools that students of all grade levels can use to demonstrate their learning. This will include the use of drag-and-drop images and video for younger students and incorporating multiple formats of digital media into a comprehensive single artifact for older students. Tools covered include Google Slides for iPad, iMovie app for iPad, WeVideo free version, Screencastify, Google Slides templates and Google Forms templates. An asynchronous discussion of the learning tools of this module will be required. Participants will respond to guiding questions and provide feedback to other participants.

(3hrs)Module 3: Participants will learn about the importance of collaboration and how it relates to Dr. Bill Daggett’s Future Ten Skills, which is a framework for preparing students for career readiness in a constantly evolving technological world. Participants will explore various tools that students can use to strengthen their Future Ten Skills, such as Google Meets, Google Workspace for Education tools, Google Sites, Blogger, and social media outlets. An asynchronous discussion of the learning tools of this module will be required. Participants will respond to guiding questions and provide feedback to other participants.

(3hrs)Module 4: Participants will learn about various research tools for students of all grade levels and gain an understanding of the importance of students’ ability to select resources for relevancy, currency, authority, accuracy, and purpose. Participants will learn how to engage students in critical evaluation of internet resources and searching various catalogs available through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC). An asynchronous discussion of the learning tools of this module will be required. Participants will respond to guiding questions and provide feedback to other participants.

(1.5hr) Live Meeting: 8/10/21 from 4:00-5:30 pm

Final Project Requirements: 

Instructor has to include in the write-up of the lesson the standards that it fulfills (could be MA standards or ISTE) as well as research showing it is a best practice.  

Project Description:  

Participants will be required to submit a project-based learning activity for students in their grade level/subject area. The activity will include the following:

  1. Introduction to topic using an interactive teacher-created resource to engage students in learning new content (Pear Deck, EdPuzzle, escape room, etc.)
  2. Student activity in which students create a learning artifact using multiple digital file formats (video, images, audio recordings, etc.)
  3. Student activity that fosters development of collaboration, communication, and Future Ten Skills
  4. Student activity that fosters development of research skills, evaluation of resources, and fair use of multiple resources

Note: Requirements 2-4 above can apply to one student activity. For example, a project in which students research a topic and create a collaborative blog about the research topic with text, photos, videos, and infographics would meet all of the requirements.

 Optional Graduate Credit:   

Educators who would like Worcester State credit (for a fee of $125) must submit a final project. Projects may be a curriculum lesson or classroom project based in research and connected to curriculum standards. Instructors will grade the project. To obtain the credit the grade must be a B or higher.

This course supports the following Massachusetts Digital Literacy and Computer Science standards:

K-2.DTC.a.1: Operate a variety of digital tools (e.g., open/close, find, save/print, navigate, use input/output devices).

K-2.DTC.a.2: Identify, locate, and use letters, numbers, and special keys on a keyboard (e.g., Space Bar, Shift, Delete).

K-2.DTC.a.3: Create a simple digital artifact.

K-2.DTC.a.4: Use appropriate digital tools individually and collaboratively to create, review, and revise simple artifacts that include text, images and audio.

K-2.DTC.b.1:  Collaboratively use digital tools and media resources to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains.

K-2.DTC.b.2: Use a variety of digital tools to exchange information and feedback with teachers.

K-2.DTC.b.3: Use a variety of digital tools to present information to others.  

K-2.DTC.c.1: Conduct basic keyword searches to gather information from teacher-provided digital sources (e.g., online library catalog, databases).

K-2.DTC.c.2: Create an artifact individually and collaboratively that answers a research question, while clearly expressing thoughts and ideas.

K-2.DTC.c.3: Acknowledge and name sources of information or media (e.g., title of book, author of book, website).

3-5.DTC.a.2: Navigate between local, networked, or online/cloud environments and transfer files between each (upload/download).

3-5.DTC.a.3 Use digital tools (local and online) to manipulate and publish multimedia artifacts.  

3-5.DTC.b.1: Communicate key ideas and details individually or collaboratively in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains using digital tools and media-rich resources.  

3-5.DTC.b.2: Collaborate through online digital tools under teacher supervision.  

3-5.DTC.c.1: Identify digital information sources to answer research questions (e.g., online library catalog, online encyclopedias, databases, websites).

3-5.DTC.c.2: Perform searches to locate information using two or more key words and techniques to refine and limit such searches.

3-5.DTC.c.3: Evaluate digital sources for accuracy, relevancy, and appropriateness

3-5.DTC.c.4: Gather and organize information from digital sources by quoting, paraphrasing, and/or summarizing.

3-5.DTC.c.5: Create an artifact that answers a research question and clearly communicates thoughts and ideas.

3-5.DTC.c.6: Cite text-based sources using a school- or district-adopted format.

3-5.DTC.c.7: Provide basic source information [e.g., Uniform Resource Locator (URL), date accessed] for non-text-based sources (e.g., images, audio, video).

6-8.DTC.a.3 Integrate information from multiple file formats into a single artifact. 

6-8.DTC.a.4: Individually and collaboratively, use advanced tools to design and create online content (e.g., digital portfolio, multimedia, blog, webpage).  

6-8.DTC.b.1: Communicate and publish key ideas and details individually or collaboratively in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains using a variety of digital tools and media-rich resources.  

6-8.DTC.b.2 Collaborate synchronously and asynchronously through online digital tools.  

6-8.DTC.b.3 Demonstrate ability to communicate appropriately through various online tools (e.g., e-mail, social media, texting, blog comments). 

6-8.DTC.c.1: Perform advanced searches to locate information using a variety of digital sources (e.g., Boolean Operators, limiters like reading level, subject, media type).

6-8.DTC.c.2: Evaluate quality of digital sources for reliability, including currency, relevancy, authority, accuracy, and purpose of digital information.

6-8.DTC.c.3: Gather, organize, and analyze information from digital sources by quoting, paraphrasing, and/or summarizing.

6-8.DTC.c.4: Create an artifact, individually and collaboratively, that answers a research question and communicates results and conclusions.

6-8.DTC.c.5: Use digital citation tools to cite sources using a school- or district-adopted format [e.g., Modern Language Association (MLA)], including proper citation for all text and non-text sources (e.g., images, audio, video).

9-12.DTC.a.1: Use digital tools to design and develop a significant digital artifact (e.g., multipage website, online portfolio, simulation). 

9-12.DTC.a.2: Select digital tools or resources based on their efficiency and effectiveness to use for a project or assignment and justify the selection. 

9-12.DTC.b.1: Communicate and publish key ideas and details to a variety of audiences using digital tools and media-rich resources.

9-12.DTC.b.2: Collaborate on a substantial project with outside experts or others through online digital tools (e.g., science fair project, community service project, capstone project). 

9-12.DTC.c.1: Generate, evaluate, and prioritize questions that can be researched through digital resources or tools.

9-12.DTC.c.2: Perform advanced searches to locate information and/or design a data-collection approach to gather original data (e.g., qualitative interviews, surveys, prototypes, simulations).

9-12.DTC.c.3: Evaluate digital sources needed to solve a given problem (e.g., reliability, point of view, relevancy).

9-12.DTC.c.4: Gather, organize, analyze, and synthesize information using a variety of digital tools.

9-12.DTC.c.5: Create an artifact that answers a research question, communicates results and conclusions, and cites sources.

Sign Up for This Workshop

DR Digital Collaboration – Don’t Reinvent!

July 13, 2021 – August 10, 2021

Required live meetings:

7/13/21 from 4:00-5:30 pm &

8/10/21 from 4:00-5:30 pm

Register Now
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